On Appreciating Nature

This post may be considered my personal response to the death of Cecil the lion.

INTRODUCTION

This post can be considered as my response to the tragedy involving Cecil the lion. Before getting into the main body of it I am once again going to share details (as I did in my previous post) of The Art of Autism’s calendar for 2016, currently being sold for $12. Full details can be seen on their own post on the subject, but I offer you this picture as extra inducement…

A picture to show you why as well as wishing to support the activity I am genuinely enthused by this calendar.
A picture to show you why as well as wishing to support the activity I am genuinely enthused by this calendar.

ON APPRECIATING NATURE

We are now in the main part of the post, which as well as what I am writing on my account will feature some photographic highlights relating to nature from the last few months, a variety of important links, and leading from here into the rest of the post my first essay in the craft of infographic creation…

Swan infographic

CECIL THE LION

Cecil, a 13 year-old lion who jointly controlled his pride with another lion called Jericho, was shot by a wealthy American who had paid $50,000 to have him lured out of the reserve in which he lived. Walter Palmer, the shooter, has a long and bloody history of such activities, including at least one felony conviction involving poaching. Cecil was a huge tourist attraction, and even from the purely monetary angle (not a viewpoint with which I identify) his death has cost far than the $50,000 that was paid to bring it about. Before moving on from this introduction I have a bunch of Cecil related links to share with you:

There seems little doubt that Mr Palmer’s activities, and those activities that were paid for with his blood money were in breach of Zimbabwean law, and as a staunch internationalist I would say that the American government has a duty to ensure that Mr Palmer gets appropriately punished, either by putting him on the next plane to Zimbabwe to be punished in the country where he committed the crime or by arranging for him to be tried, convicted and punished in America.

I would also like to see a blanket ban on “trophy hunting”, enforced with stringent penalties for those who breach it. Also, I have concentrated on the American, rather than the two Zimbabweans involved in the atrocity because it is the American who bears full responsibility – without his money the two Zimbabweans would have had no motive for their nefarious contact – Mr Palmer is guilty on his own account and has made criminals of the other two involved.

SOME PICTORIAL HIGHLIGHTS

This subsection is devoted the only kind of shooting I am interested in performing – that done with my trusty Nikon Coolpix P530. Yes I have recently acquired a set of five obsidian arrowheads – but that was purchased as on object of interest, not with any intention of using them as weapons!

The first two pictures are of an insect that was crawling on the window of an X8 bus in which I happened to  be a passenger.
The first two pictures are of an insect that was crawling on the window of an X8 bus in which I happened to be a passenger.

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These two robins, enjoying the local park, formed the basis of my second ever pictorial thank you message.
These two robins, enjoying the local park, formed the basis of my second ever pictorial thank you message.
This lone robin was by the bandstand in the local park.
This lone robin was by the bandstand in the local park.

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A squirrel preparing for the main ascent!
A squirrel preparing for the main ascent!

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A Moorhen
A Moorhen

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A swimming gull, reflected back by the smooth water.
A swimming gull, reflected back by the smooth water.

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A moorhen showing a turn of speed
A moorhen showing a turn of speed
This one was standing on a submerged log
This one was standing on a submerged log
A cormorant - the first of many.
A cormorant – the first of many.

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Cormornant showing off its wingspan
Cormornant showing off its wingspan
Fully extended.
Fully extended.

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A cormorant on the structure that I named Cormorant Platform because they make so much use of it.
A cormorant on the structure that I named Cormorant Platform because they make so much use of it.
Swans in the parkland off Littleport Street
Swans in the parkland off Littleport Street

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Bunny enjoying the thick grass.
Bunny enjoying the thick grass.

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One of my ornithological alter egos - a magpie.
One of my ornithological alter egos – a magpie.
The only time I have ever got a really got shot of one of these white butterflies - they move seriously fast
The only time I have ever got a really got shot of one of these white butterflies – they move seriously fast

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A cormorant and black backed gull together.
A cormorant and black backed gull together.

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A cormorant in swimming mode.
A cormorant in swimming mode.
These were the first ducklings I saw in 2015.
These were the first ducklings I saw in 2015.
This crafty duckling had realised that it could use the lily pad as a kind of boat.
This crafty duckling had realised that it could use the lily pad as a kind of boat.

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These three shots were gold from my point of view - usually if a cormorant is swimming it is looking for food and therefore dives regularly, making it tough to capture on camera.
These three shots were gold from my point of view – usually if a cormorant is swimming it is looking for food and therefore dives regularly, making it tough to capture on camera.

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Gulls in full flight
Gulls in full flight

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Mallard drake and moorhen being companionable on the edge of the upper Millfleet.
Mallard drake and moorhen being companionable on the edge of the upper Millfleet.
I had seen swans on various rivers, but until July 2015 never on the Great Ouse which is tidal and flows seriously fast.
I had seen swans on various rivers, but until July 2015 never on the Great Ouse which is tidal and flows seriously fast.

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These birds like marshy land best, but mud flats when the Great Ouse is at low tide are clearly also acceptable to them.
These birds like marshy land best, but mud flats when the Great Ouse is at low tide are clearly also acceptable to them.
The base of my current pictorial thank you message.
The base of my current pictorial thank you message.

Every single photo in this subsection was bagged within walking distance of my “compact” town centre flat – if you truly appreciate nature you do not have go very far to find glorious sights, and nothing need be harmed.

A FEW NATURE RELATED LINKS

These two links are both to petitions that anyone who takes an interest i nature should sign and share:

1)This from 38Degrees is an emergeny petition about bees

2)Take Part are running this petition against unsafe drilling in the Arctic Ocean.

A FINAL REMINDER

To finish the main section of this blog I have another infographic, which gives the same message as the one I opened the section with – the fundamental message of this post…

Nature infographic

GENERAL LINKS

Just a handful of links today:

Author: Thomas

I am branch secretary of NAS West Norfolk and #actuallyautistic (diagnosed 10 years ago at the comparatively advanced age of 31). I am a keen photographer, so that most of my own posts contain photos. I am a keen cricket fan and often write about that subject. I also focus a lot on politics and on nature.

6 thoughts on “On Appreciating Nature”

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