A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 10: The Map Room at St Michael’s Mount

Continuing my account of my visit to Cornwall. Today we look at the map room at St Michael’s Mount.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the latest post in my series about my visit to Cornwall. As part of my coverage of a day at St Michael’s Mount I am devoting a whole post to the map collection there.

A Collection of Antique Maps

For a cartophile such as me this section of the visit was particularly good fun…

Plymouth to Senan
In the days before googlemaps this is what a walking route looked like!

Exeter to TruroeWilliam Holes - Devon and Cornwall

Jan Janssons Cornwall
At one time the Dutch were trailblazers when it came to cartography.

two antique maps of CornwallJames Pigot's CornwallModelFour antique maps of CornwallNicolas Sansons West of England MapThe Isles of ScillyChristopher Saxton's CornwallMounts BayMap room mantelshelfMounts Bay IIThree views of cornish buildingsduoDuo IICottage PicSextetSextet II

Falmouth
Falmouth – one of the people who have noticed my posts about cornwall is thecornishbird, whose offerings include this about Falmouth: https://cornishbirdblog.com/2018/07/14/things-to-do-in-falmouth/

sextet IIIThree maps in one frameCornwall and Devonshiresix maps, two pictures

A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 9: The Top of St Michael’s Mount and the Descent

Continuing my account of a visit to St Michael’s Mount.

INTRODUCTION

This is the third to last post about the day at St Michael’s Mount, and the ninth in my series about my summer visit to Cornwall. The next post will be all about the vast collection of antique maps that are on show here, and then a final post about the last stages of the day. I then have the journey home to cover to complete the series.

THE REMAINDER OF THE SUMMIT

At the end of the previous post in this series were about to head indoors for the second time in our exploration of St Michael’s Mount…

The mainlandStained glass VIIRoseCarving and stone inscriptionTrio of miniaturesShepherdEagle and windowangelthree in one frameSeptetRose II

Organ
This organ looks splendid.

Organ close-up 1Organ close-up 2DedicationAngel and windowMemorial and windowMemorials and windowPainting and windowTrio and window panelsText and windowThe second Lord St LevanArchitectOrgan and windowLiving roomPortrait XPortrait XIMantel clockbusts and windowCupid

At this point we entered the map room. As an appetiser for the next post I offer one picture from there…

Christopher Saxton's Cornwall

After the maps came a display featuring large amounts of weaponry…

remains of spiral staircase
The remains of a spiral staircase

hornDollArmour IgunsTruncheonstruncheons and gunsMore gunsWeapons VSpearsWeaponryWeaponry IIShield IIHorses Head

Cornish map with extras
A final map, separated from all the others.

girls armourbreastplates and helmetsGiant clock IClockfaceClock case18th Century mugMug provenanceUniformCapShoulder plate

That ended the indoor stuff until lunch time.

THE DESCENT

The descent takes past an emplacement of mini-cannons which are of French Revolutionary origin…

mini cannonsMini cannoncannon markings ICannon markings IICannon markings IIIMini cannon emplacementCannon markings IVCannon markings VCornish flagCannon markings VICauseway from the cannon emplacementFarewell to the cannons

Just beyond this I encountered a Red Admiral butterfly:

Red Admiral I
At first it had its wings folded making ID difficult…

Red Admiral II

Red Admiral III
…but when it opened them out there was little room for doubt.

Red Admiral IV

Not long after this we could see our next destination, where we would be having lunch.

Nearly back at sea levelsea level buildings

A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 8: Ascending St Michael’s Mount

Continuing my account of my visit to Cornwall, with the ascent of St Michael’s Mount.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the latest post in my series about my stay in Cornwall. This post takes us up St Michael’s Mount and covers some of the stuff at the top. There will be at least two and possibly three more posts about the day.

BASE CAMP (!)

Among the places at ground level, before the ascent begins are the restaurant where we would be having lunch and a visitor’s centre which provides a comprehensive introduction. After these one passes through a field that contains a dairy cottage before the ascent begins.

Ships in the distanceSea ViewFind Your WayMapLooking back at the mainlandMuralIllyriaFootprintsMural PlaqueModel of the mountPlan the dayWelcome to St Michael's MountPicture of the mountTL1

TL2
No sops for creationists here! The straight truth about the formation of the granite of which the mount consists – it was formed longer before the dinosaurs roamed the earth than we are after the last dinosaurs disappeared.

TL3The castleThe GardensTL4Boat 1Boat 2Boat info boardThe DrakeAmphibious vehiclesDUKWBoat on the islandThe St MichaelOur venue for lunchMarazion from the IslandThe abbey from belowCreelsOutdoor artworkHutConservation notice

THE ASCENT BEGINS

The climb up to the buildings on top of the mount begins by way of The Pilgrims Steps, continues past the Giant’s Well and the Giant’s Heart and a cannon emplacement. Then comes the first indoor section and a roof terrace where we pause until the next post in this series…

The pilgrims stepsView across the sea

Giants Well
The Giant’s Well – from an old folk tale

Giants Well sign

The vicinity of the Giants Heart
And about 50 yards further along The Giant’s Heart.

The giants heart sign

The Giants Heart
The actual heart!

FrontageArcher's alcoveSea view from aboveSea view from above IISea view from above IIICannonsCannonMarking on cannonView from the cannon emplacementSea View from above IVThe main buildingDistant view of PenzanceYachts and a headlandPenzance from St Michael's Mounttwo yachtsThree yachts

Wall mounted militaria I
The first weapons display – in the next post you will see another one.

Swordsthree swordsGunsGunCrossbowJewellery displayCannon and ammogiant crestCrossed swords ICrossed swords IIDrummers kitPortrait 1Portrait 2Trio IMantelpiece and trioClockCentral UnitGrandfather clockCentral Unit IIBoyPortrait IVCorner unitChest IChest IITrio IILadyArtists representation of the mountMiniaturesquartetLady IIQuartet IIMiniatures IIMiniatures close-upFancy CabinetLiving spaceLibrary and game zoneChess boardChess board IIHeraldry display wallRoof patterning and friezechapelShieldsshields and ornamentsLong tablefrieze workstained glass Istained glass IIstained glass IIIsingle panelShields anf friezeshields and friezeRoof beamsAlcovewooden bas-reliefShieldSilverwareSilverware IISilverware IIIStained glass VStained glass VIShip panelstained glass womanTriple panelstained glass heraldic lionStained glass jester panelCircular stained glass panelsSilverware IVdecorated chestQuintetOval picturePicture of a Cornish gentFireplaceTrio IVbay window

Garden from above I
Us hoi polloi can only view these gardens from above – we never actually get into them.

A study in blueGarden from above IIGarden from above IIIGarden from above IV

Sundial
A very elaborate sundial.

Detail from sundial

Roof terrace
This where our next post will start from.

A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 7: Walking to St Michael’s Mount

Continuing my series about my visit to Cornwall, with the first of several posts about St Michael’s Mount.

INTRODUCTION

This series has been widely spread out – the trip it describes took place between July 12 and 16. Here is a listing of the previous posts:

  1. Getting There
  2. St Germans to St Ives
  3. A Visit to a Seal Colony
  4. The End of the St Ives Day
  5. Crossing the Cremyll Ferry to Plymouth
  6. Historic Plymouth

Having covered Thursday, Friday and Saturday in six posts we arfe now dealing with the Sunday, my last full day in Cornwall.

THE PLAN

As all five of us (my parents, my sister and my nephew as well as me) were making the visit to St Michael’s Mount we travelled in my parents camper van instead of using the train. We wanted to be underway by eight and achieved this. We were planning to explore St Michael’s Mount in full and then have lunch at an establishment there. Things panned out pretty much as intended. The road journey is a lot less scenic than the rail equivalent, so I am going to recommend unequivocally that anyone else planning to do this use the train – the walk from Penzance (all of which is familiar to me, although we started part way along it, having located a parking place just outside Penzance) is very scenic, while there is a longer walk available from St Erth (inland for most of its duration, instead of along the sea front). Here are a couple of satellite views:

Penzance - St Michael's Mount
The coastal route starting from Penzance.
St Erth to St Michael's Mount
The longer and mainly inland route starting from St Erth. This map also features what is in alphabetic terms the last place in Britain.

St Erth to St Michael's Mount

THE JOURNEY IN PHOTOGRAPHS

This section ends the post, taking us across the causeway to the base of the mount:

View from the van
The only shot I managed to get from the van on the way from Fort Picklecombe to Penzance.

Culvert ICulvert 2Welcome to PenzancePlastic FreeLooking towards PenzanceSt Michael's Mount ISt Aubyn's AbbeyGulls and signal boxView of PenzanceThe line towards St Erthtrack sideWarehouseSt Michael's Mount (1)St Michael's MountBeach sceneMastChurch TowerSailing boatsTrain coming towards PenzanceApproaching trainTrainRear of trainTrain heads for Penzance (1)Train heads for PenzanceAlmost out of viewTrain in foregroundblue plantGWR depotRolling stockThe MountThe abbeyLookingb towards the mountThe Mount IILooking towards the mountCommemorative benchThe Station House, MarazionMarazion station signMarazion stationSt Aubyn's Abbey from Marazion

People crossing the causeway to the mount
A first glimpse of the causeway.

People on the causewayWelcome to Marazion MarshMarazion MarshBird in the nature reserveLooking up at the mount

In the shallows
From Marazion the quickest way to the causeway is straight across the beach, and in the heat walking barefoot through the shallows was the way to go.

St Michaels Mount from Marazion beachLooking across at the mountGullsOutcrop observation point near start of causewayThe mount from near the start of the causewayThe abbey from near the causeway

The causeway and the mount
The causeway.

The mount viewed from the start of the causewayThe Abbey from the causewayLooking out to sea from thje causewayapproaching the Mount

 

A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 6: Historic Plymouth

Continuing my account of my most recent visit to Cornwall.

INTRODUCTION

Yes, Plymouth is Devon not Cornwall, but my visit to the town was part of my stay in Cornwall, so it belongs in this very spread out series of posts.

THE WAR MEMORIAL

This particular memorial honours those lost at sea as well as those killed in war, because Plymouth is very much a naval town.

Memorial - distant view
A first, distant view of the memorial
Memorial base
A series of close-ups – each vertical bronze panel around the base is a list of names.

Memorial close-up IMemorial close-up IIMemorial close-up IIIMemorial close-up IVMemorial close-up VMemorial close-up VIMemorial close-up VII

Memorial and Lighthouse in the distance

OTHER PICTURES FROM HISTORIC PLYMOUTH

There were plenty of other things to see around the sea-front…

Warrior statuestatue and flagsColumn topLighthouseWarrior statue IILooking along The HoeTrident wielding statueIslandsbuildings overlooking The HoeLighthouse plaqueYachts and a warshipObservatoryWelcome to Plymouth HoeYahcts and a warship IILighthouse IIRAF StatueMapSea View IIIMemorial and Lighthouse in the distanceSmall HarbourIslandGrand building, PlymouthChurch Tower

Circualr paving pattern
A quirky pavong arrangement…
Eddystione Lighthouse
…and an explanatory plaque

Building on way back to ferry

AN ITEM OF SHERLOCKIANA

It will be no news to followers of this blog that I am a fan of the world’s first and greatest consulting detective, so it was pleasing to acquire a photograph with a connection in that direction:

ACD blue plaque

One of Holmes’ most famous cases takes place on Dartmoor, not far from Plymouth.

THE RETURN CROSSING

It was now time to recross the county boundary into Cornwall, one again on the Edgecumbe Belle.

QuaysideStatue atop buildingWaterside buildingView from the Ferry (I)View from the Ferry (II)View from the ferry (III)Approaching CremyllCormorantFrameworkTrio of tower blocksSlipway

A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 5: Crossing the Cremyll Ferry to Plymouth

The latest installment in my series “A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall”. This starts my coverage of Saturday in Plymouth.

INTRODUCTION

My nephew needed some things that we had to go to Plymouth for, and so he, my mother and I took the Cremyll ferry to Plymouth, attended to the shopping and then went up on to The Hoe (subject of my next post). 

THE CREMYLL FERRY

Once we were safely aboard the ferry it was time for the camera to do its work:

HarbourClock near the Cremyll FerryThe Edgecumbe BelleMany boatsLooking towards PlymouthYachtsYachts and a small settlementView across the waterLooking towards the breakwaterWarehousesStatueWater viewPlymouth buildingsPlymouth buildings IISun on the watera forest of mastsBoatsApproaching Plymouth

THE SHOPPING PART OF THE EXPEDITION

We had a substantial walk from the ferry terminal on the Plymouth side to the shopping area, during which I saw a few things to photograph:

Southwest Coast path

The first (or last) pub in Devon
Depending on your viewpoint this is…
Twin signs
…either the first or last pub in Devon

Glass frontagePanelRoyal Marines BarracksRoyal marines Barracks IIWood fronted buildingSea ViewSea View IIOld building and giant craneMarinaOld buildingBrunel WayParkland entrancePortland stone buildingClock TowerOutiusde house of FraserDrake CircusThe approach to Drake CircusMetal columnA Day Out on the HoeDrake Circus circular benchTop of columnLarge buildingChurch towerPlymouth - Britain's Ocean CityLocal mapPlaqueArchInterlocking metal circles above one of tghe uprights of the archPlymouth Magistrates Court

Greedy Goose
The Greedy Goose, this is also the oldest house in Plymouth. I did not get to eat here, but it is a splendid building.

Greedy Goose courtyardChurchCity gull

A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 4: The End of the St Ives Day

The latest post in my series “A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall”, concluding my account of my day out in St Ives.

INTRODUCTION

In my previous post in this spread out series about my recent visit to Cornwall (Thursday July 12  through Monday July 16) I covered a boat trip to see a seal colony. I now account for the rest of that day after the trip. Don’t forget that a more local view of St Ives is available from The Cornish Maid.

BACK ON TERRA FIRMA

I was back in St Ives at 1:15PM as scheduled, and had two definite targets for the remainder of my time there – find a cash machine and find somewhere not too extortionate for lunch. By this stage the town was packed, and far as I was able to locate there was a but a single cashpoint there, so I had a bit of a wait. Still I eventually got my money and found a place to have lunch.

statueMemorialCutlery and condiments

Victorian house
This building may once have been a non-conformist chapel.

Lighthouse II

THE RETURN JOURNEY

I was back at the station in good time for my three stage journey back to St Germans (changes at St Erth and Liskeard, and longish waits at both). My father collected me from St Germans and we headed to Cawsand to meet my mother, sister and nephew at a pub there before heading to Fort Picklecombe together. My camera battery just made it to St Germans before giving out for the day after one more picture en route for Cawsand.

St Ives for home journeyBoat through the treesView through the treesRiver meets the seaRiverriver mouthbirds, Lelant SaltingsTrain, St ErthSt Erth stationBranch line cafetrain departs for PenzanceIncoming trainMarshland IIIRiverside viewCamborne mapTownscapeback at St Germans

View from the car
I suspected (rightly as it turned out) that I had only one shot left by this stage, and this view, from the heights above Cawsand, seemed a worthy way to finish my photography for the day.