A Grockle’s Eye View of Cornwall 6: Historic Plymouth

Continuing my account of my most recent visit to Cornwall.

INTRODUCTION

Yes, Plymouth is Devon not Cornwall, but my visit to the town was part of my stay in Cornwall, so it belongs in this very spread out series of posts.

THE WAR MEMORIAL

This particular memorial honours those lost at sea as well as those killed in war, because Plymouth is very much a naval town.

Memorial - distant view
A first, distant view of the memorial
Memorial base
A series of close-ups – each vertical bronze panel around the base is a list of names.

Memorial close-up IMemorial close-up IIMemorial close-up IIIMemorial close-up IVMemorial close-up VMemorial close-up VIMemorial close-up VII

Memorial and Lighthouse in the distance

OTHER PICTURES FROM HISTORIC PLYMOUTH

There were plenty of other things to see around the sea-front…

Warrior statuestatue and flagsColumn topLighthouseWarrior statue IILooking along The HoeTrident wielding statueIslandsbuildings overlooking The HoeLighthouse plaqueYachts and a warshipObservatoryWelcome to Plymouth HoeYahcts and a warship IILighthouse IIRAF StatueMapSea View IIIMemorial and Lighthouse in the distanceSmall HarbourIslandGrand building, PlymouthChurch Tower

Circualr paving pattern
A quirky pavong arrangement…
Eddystione Lighthouse
…and an explanatory plaque

Building on way back to ferry

AN ITEM OF SHERLOCKIANA

It will be no news to followers of this blog that I am a fan of the world’s first and greatest consulting detective, so it was pleasing to acquire a photograph with a connection in that direction:

ACD blue plaque

One of Holmes’ most famous cases takes place on Dartmoor, not far from Plymouth.

THE RETURN CROSSING

It was now time to recross the county boundary into Cornwall, one again on the Edgecumbe Belle.

QuaysideStatue atop buildingWaterside buildingView from the Ferry (I)View from the Ferry (II)View from the ferry (III)Approaching CremyllCormorantFrameworkTrio of tower blocksSlipway

Calling All Sherlockians…

A flag-up of the latest piece on my London Transport themed website.

The latest post on my London Transport themed website looks at the paucity of mentions of London Underground in the official canon of stories about the world’s most famous consulting detective (from whose rooms Baker Street station is visible vide The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet).

INTRODUCTION

Only one of the original canon of Sherlock Holmes stories features any action on what is now London Underground, the Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans, which features tracks on today’s Metropolitan, District, Circle and Hammersmith & City lines. In The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet mention is made of the fact that Baker Street station is visible from 221B. The rest of this post is going to examine that lacuna from the London Underground viewpoint.

Read the rest of the piece at: http://www.londontu.be/sherlock-holmes-and-london-underground/

Please share widely!

Special Post: Baker Street

INTRODUCTION

This post is the fifth in a series I am running on this blog providing a station by station guide to London.

HISTORY, ASTRONOMY AND DETECTIVES

Baker Street was one of the original stations that opened in 1863 as The Metropolitan Railway, the world’s first underground public transport system, on January the 10th 1863. Those platforms, two of 10 at that station (the most on the entire system) to be served by underground trains, are still in service today, and have been restored to look as they would have done when first opened. Ironically, they are no longer served by the Metropolitan line, which uses two terminal and two through platforms just to the north of the originals, its tracks joining those of the Hammersmith and City and Circle lines just east of Baker Street. By way of explanation I turn to Douglas Rose’s London Underground: A Diagrammatic History


DSCN6333

The other two lines that serve this station are the Bakerloo and Jubilee lines. Baker Street is a division point between the old and new Jubilee lines – south of Baker Street is all new track, northwards old, dating from 1939, when it was opened as a branch of the Bakerloo, taking some of the strain of the Metropolitan by taking over services to Stanmore and assuming sole responsibility for intermediate stops between Baker Street and Finchley Road, and also between Finchley Road and Wembley Park. When the Jubilee opened in 1979 it comprised the old Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo and three stations south of Baker Street.

Reverting temporarily to the Metropolitan, those four platforms at Baker Street, from which trains go to a variety of destinations developed from what started as a single track branch going only as far as Swiss Cottage. It grew out of all recognition during the tenure of Edward Watkin, who saw the Metropolitan as a crucial link in his plan for a railway system to link his three favourite cities, London, Paris and Manchester. At one time, as my next picture shows, the Metropolitan went far beyond it’s current reach…

DSCN6336

Baker Street is home to Madame Tussaud’s and the London Planetarium, both of which merit a visit.

Of course, no post about Baker Street would be complete without something about it’s most famous ever resident, Mr Sherlock Holmes, consulting detective.

I am an avid fan of the great detective, having read all the original stories and many modern stories that feature the great detective. As well as owning a respectable collection of my own, I regularly borrow books about this subject from the libraries that I use…

A remarkable recent find.
A remarkable recent find.
The great originals.
The great originals
Some of my modern Holmes stories.
Some of my modern Holmes stories.

To end this post, along with my customary hopes that you have enjoyed it and that you will share it, a couple more maps, first a facsimile of the original Beck map of 1933 and then for comparison a facsimile of the 1926 Underground Map…

When Beck first produced a prototype of this map in 1931 his superiors thought that no-one would like it - but eventually they agreed to a trial of it in 1933, and now every public transport system in the world uses schematic diagrams of this type.
When Beck first produced a prototype of this map in 1931 his superiors thought that no-one would like it – but eventually they agreed to a trial of it in 1933, and now every public transport system in the world uses schematic diagrams of this type.

When Beck first produced a prototype of this map in 1931 his superiors thought that no-one would like it - but eventually they agreed to a trial of it in 1933, and now every public transport system in the world uses schematic diagrams of this type.

Heritage Open Day 3: Masonic Temple

The Masonic Temple, at the heart of Philanthropic Lodge 107, is quite remarkable, all the more so  for being housed within another building that serves an altogether different purpose – The Dukes Head which faces the Tuesday Market Place in King’s Lynn.

Masonic regalia frequently goes under the hammer at James and Sons auctions and has been known to do well, but this collection was astonishing.

There are rumours that Mozart joined a Masonic Lodge, while Sherlockians will recall that Jabez Wilson in “The Adventure of the Red Headed League” is a freemason. For fans of more modern literature, Matthew Reilly’s Jack West series features freemasonry.

The next installment of this series features a house on Ferry Lane and in the meantime here are my attempts to do photographic justice to Philanthropic Lodge 107…

Philanthropic 107
The door mat tells you what you are entering.

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Even the ceiling had points of interest!
Even the ceiling had points of interest!

Throne Sword Flags

Globes
I particularly liked this display

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Atc and Compass
The famed arc and compass

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Medals
Medals