Cornish Winter Break 5: Eden Project (3)

My third and final post about this visit to the Eden Project – dealing with the Mediterranean Biome.

INTRODUCTION

This is my third and last post about our family outing to the Eden Project, covering the Mediterranean Biome.

MEDITERRANEAN IN CONTEXT

There are other parts of the world that have the same type of climate as the Mediterranean – parts of South Africa, southwestern Australia and parts of the USA, and they all feature in this Biome. There was much bird life in evidence in the Biome as well. My camera got steamed up and I failed to notice, so the photographs did not come out as well as I would have liked, but nonetheless I share them. After we had finished in this Biome we had a late lunch (sausage casserole with accompanying vegetables in my case, washed down with a bottle of locally brewed beer – from St Austell, the closest town of any significance) and then made our way back to the car park, availing ourselves of the bus from the visitor’s centre because I was getting tired by then (a legacy of the cancer that nearly killed me at the back end of 2018). I will certainly be visiting this place again in the not too distant future and would list at as an absolute must see place if you are visiting Cornwall.

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A plan of the Biome.

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These last few pictures were taken outside, on the way back to the visitor centre.

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Cornish Winter Break 4: Eden Project (2)

Continuing my account of the family outing to the Eden Project.

INTRODUCTION

In my last post I began my coverage of a family outing to the Eden Project, and in this post I continue it with my coverage of the new building next to the biomes, which is dedicated to stuff which is usually invisible.

MAKING THE INVISIBLE VISIBLE

This was time extremely well spent. As is my way I tell the rest of the story in pictures:

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What this building is all about (and as I hope the rest of these pictures convey, it is done magnificently).

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This creation is right in the centre of the building.

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A close up of one of the ‘smoke rings’ blown the machine in the centre of the building.

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Another close up of a ‘smoke ring’

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My next and final post about the Eden Project will deal with the Mediterranean Biome where we finished our visit.

Cornish Winter Break 3: Eden Project (1)

The first of several posts about the Eden Project in my series about my Cornish winter holiday.

INTRODUCTION

After a brief aside it is time to resume my coverage of my Cornish winter holiday with the first of what will be several posts about the Eden Project.

GETTING THERE

This was a family trip, and we travelled from my parents place by car. There is generous car parking provision, but you can also travel there by public transport (train to St Austell and then a connecting bus to the Eden Project). We just missed a bus from the car park to the visitors centre and walked there instead. This was my second visit, but the place had developed so massively from my first visit that it was effectively a new experience. After the purchase of tickets we decided what to do. We settled on the Walk Through Time, the new building and the Mediterranean Biome (the biomes, as you will see are remarkable structures whose architecture owes much to the legendary Richard Buckminster Fuller). Here are some early pictures before I take you on the walk through time:

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A shot taken in transit.

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For twitter users this is one way to contact the Eden Project.
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The biomes from above (three shots)

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The roof of the new building.

THE WALK THROUGH TIME

This is a wonderful lead in to the biomes and the new building, and there is only one real way to tell it, especially for me:

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The entrance the new building, which will form the subject of my next post.

Franchise Squad From The Before The White Ball Era

I name a franchise squad comprising entirely players from before white ball cricket was played – and challenge cricket fans among my readers to do likewise.

INTRODUCTION

I am deviating briefly from my coverage of my stay in Cornwall because mention was made of players from the past who would have been useful in franchise cricket during this morning’s BBL commentary on Test Match Special, and I got thinking about a franchise squad comprised of players who flourished before white ball cricket was played.

RULES

To be eligible for consideration under my rules players must have retired before the inaugural T20 cup took place in 2003. Also, unless a very good reason can be found players considered for this must have had some international experience. At least one recognized wicketkeeper must be in the squad.

THOMAS’S SQUAD

I have named 15 for my squad, an envisaged first XI and four reserves.

GILBERT LAIRD JESSOP

The most consistently fast scoring batter in the game’s history (he reached 100 in less than an hour at the crease 11 times in first class cricket, and in a career that included 53 centuries he only once batted as long as three hours in), a gun fielder (his credits include a direct hit run out of Victor Trumper in a test match) and a crafty pace bowler. If one had a time machine to fetch him in his prime into the present day he would send an IPL auction into meltdown.

GARFIELD ST AUBRUN SOBERS

Quite simply the most complete cricketer who ever played the game – a batter capable of hitting six sixes in an over and who averaged 57.78 in test cricket, three bowlers in one (left arm seam and swing, slow left arm orthodox and slow left arm wrist spin, the latter of which would be especially useful in T20) and a brilliant fielder.

ISAAC VIVIAN ALEXANDER RICHARDS

The best batter in the early days of ODI cricket and a brilliant fielder. In view of who else is available to bowl in this squad his off spin would be unlikely to be called on.

ROBERT GRAEME POLLOCK

He averaged over 60 in test cricket, and although he never played ODIs due to South Africa being in isolation by the time that form of cricket took off he averaged over 50 in List A cricket with a best of 222 not out.

FRANK EDWARD WOOLLEY

The only cricketer to have achieved the career triple of 10,000 runs (58,969 no less), 1,000 wickets (2,066 of those) and 1,000 catches (1,018) in first class cricket, and the only non-wicketkeeper to have pouched 1,000 catches.

BASIL LEWIS D’OLIVEIRA

An attacking middle order batter and the sort of medium pace nibbler who would be very useful in T20.

LESLIE ETHELBERT GEORGE AMES

The only recognized wicketkeeper ever to score 100 first class hundreds, and he won the Lawrence trophy for the fastest hundred of the season twice in the first three years of its existence.

GEORGE HERBERT HIRST

He achieved the double of 1,000 runs and 100 wickets in a first class season 14 times in his career, including the only occasion on which anyone managed the ‘double double’ (1906, 2,385 runs and 208 wickets). An aggressive right handed bat and left arm pace bowler, he was also like Jessop what is now termed a gun fielder.

JAMES CHARLES LAKER

Probably (sorry Nathan Lyon fans, I do not buy your claims on his behalf) the best ever at what he did, namely bowling off spin. In 1956 he took 46 wickets in the Ashes series, including 19-90 in the 4th match at Old Trafford), and also helped his county to beat the Aussies by taking 10-88 (off 46 overs on a good wicket in the first innings of the match) and 2-42 in the second Aussie innings.

ALFRED SHAW

He bowled more overs in first class cricket (no List A in his day) than he conceded runs (25,699 overs bowled, 24,873 runs conceded), and captured just over 2,000 first class wickets. His impeccable length and canny variations of pace would make him an excellent option in T20. I also choose him as captain – he proved himself good at the job at a time when few professional cricketers got the chance (most captains in his era were, nominally at least, amateurs who did not get paid to play cricket).

CLARENCE VICTOR GRIMMETT

Clarrie Grimmett (aka Scarl, Old Grum or Fox) the New Zealand born Aussie leg spinner took 216 wickets in only 37 test matches (he had to wait until he was 33 to get the call), and a record first-class tally for someone who never played County Championship cricket (1,424, again at just about six wickets per game). He was exceedingly economical, commanded a range of variations (and was forever experimenting with new types of delivery), and as such would seem made for T20 bowling (although like Shaw above he would probably not have been best pleased at being restricted to four overs per innings).

WALTER REGINALD HAMMOND

A stroke playing batter with a formidable record (over 50,000 first class runs including 167 centuries), a superb slip fielder and a very capable bowler (and in T20, knowing that he would not be bowling more than four overs at any one time he may have been a little less unenthusiastic about this aspect of his game than he was in first class and test cricket). He once hit the first five balls of a days play, bowled by no less a personage than Ted Macdonald, for fours, and according to reports it was only a good bit of fielding that stopped being six fours out of six for the over.

MULVANTRAI HIMMATLAL “VINOO” MANKAD

A slow left-arm bowler, a fine batter (he regularly opened for his country in test cricket) and a capable fielder. He was the first bowler in test cricket to run out an opposition batter for backing up too far, causing a controversy that continues to flare up every time something similar happens (my sympathies are exclusively with the bowler – the batter who gets run out is trying to gain an unfair advantage). If he were to be in the team it would be fun to have Ashwin in the ranks of the opposition!

MICHAEL JOHN PROCTER

An aggressive middle order batter, a fine fielder and a fast bowler who could also bowl off breaks, Procter could come in for anyone save Ames without the side as a whole suffering.

WILLIAM JOSEPH OREILLY

A very different type of legspinner to Grimmett, bowling at around medium pace and generating extra bounce (he was tall, unlike Grimmett), O’Reilly (though he would be voluble in expressing his dislike of the format, and I am quite certain that what he would have to say about The Hundred/ Harrison’s Harebrained Have a Hit would be unprintable) would be excellent at this form of the game.

This squad gives me a plentiful supply of attacking batters, a huge range of bowling options including every style of bowling and plenty of excellent fielders.

CONCLUSION, CHALLENGE AND PHOTOGRAPHS

For ease of references here is my squad listed without comments: 1)Gilbert Jessop, 2) Garry Sobers, 3)Viv Richards, 4)Graeme Pollock, 5)Frank Woolley, 6)Basil D’Oliveira
7) +Les Ames, 8)George Hirst, 9)Jim Laker 10)*Alfred Shaw 11)Clarrie Grimmett, Reserves: Wally Hammond, Vinoo Mankad, Mike Procter, Bill O’Reilly.

For the cricket fans among my readers here is a challenge: name your own franchise squad comprising players from before T20 cricket started, either directly in the comments, or in a post of your own which you link to in the comments below.

Here are a few Cornish photos to finish…

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Two shots showing waves crashing over the breakwater that is visible from my parents living room.

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A few shots from Cawsand, the closest village to my parents home.

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Three views of Fort Picklecombe from Cawsand.

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A heron standing on the breakwater (two shots)

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The officers mess at Fort Picklecombe (permission for the building was given on condition that this part be modelled on Warwick Castle).

 

Cornish Winter Break 2: Looe

Continuing the coverage of my Cornish Winter Break with Looe and a brief mention of Rame Head.

INTRODUCTION

In my previous post I set the scene for what will be a series of posts about my festive season in Cornwall. In this one I will deal with the visit my parents and I made to Looe. I also take this opportunity to draw your attention to the fact that Phoebe is once again offering us all a chance to promote our blogs on her site – follow this link.

THE JOURNEY

We made this trip by car. There is also a rail route involving a change at Liskeard, which I may avail myself of on a future occasion. We parked just in East Looe (East and West Looe are linked by a bridge, which we walked across) and set out to explore. Here are some preliminary pictures…

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The first six pictures here were taken while in transit.

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This fort is of the same vintage as Fort Picklecombe where my parents have thier apartment.
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This was once a fine hotel – the sort of establishment in which an Agatha Christie story could be set – or one from either of Carola Dunn’s two series (it is probably more a DS Pencarrow setting, not least given its location, than a Daisy Dalrymple one, but neither would be absolutely out of place).
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The first picture from Looe itself.

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EXPLORING LOOE

There were many interesting things to see in both East and West Looe, including a few bits about the area’s history, a lifeboat station (although not being afflicted by the kind of extreme tides that northwest Norfolk gets they have only a boat, not a hovercraft as well) and a new boutique distillery (only gin, apparently not very good stuff, at present, but they will ultimately be producing whiskey which may be of better quality in due time). During the summer months, when much more is open, the place must get very crowded indeed, so I was glad to see it at a time when one could actually see the place and not just a vast mass of bodies. This was a very satisfying first outing of my Cornish holiday.

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I always like this sort of thing.

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This was where we had our lunch – and it is a TARDIS like place – you would never believe looking at this frontage how much there is inside it.

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There is a tea shop on Norfolk Street, King’s Lynn that has a display a little like this one, but this is only the second of its kind that I have seen.

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The Tower House…
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…first of order of business for a new owner would be to get the roof replaced.

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I enjoyed this little monument (two pics)

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This distillery.

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THE RETURN JOURNEY

On the way back we visited Rame Head, where there is an old church and a coast watch station. This was a splendid way to end the day.

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Some pics from the return journey.

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An old church

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Cornish Winter Break 1: Setting the Scene

Setting the scene for a series of posts about my holiday in Cornwall.

INTRODUCTION

I spent Christmas and the New Year in Cornwall, staying at my parent’s place. In this post I set the stage for series of posts to come about the things I did while there. In addition to eight places of interest (some of which merit rather more than a single post, or indeed a single visit) I will also be describing the cooking of a meal for six, which will be accompanied by some general pictures from the vicinity of my parents place. In the rest of this post I will set out the order for the rest of the series as an appetizer.

LOOE

Definitely worth a visit if you are in that part of the world.

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EDEN PROJECT

This is a truly astonishing place and one that will repay many visits. I will certainly be devoting more than one post to my visit there this holiday.

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The biomes.
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The start of the trail through time.
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An addition to the project since my only previous visit – this building is devoted to the things we normally cannot see.

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Inside the Mediterranean Biome.

LANHYDROCK

Only a little of this place was open, and I hope to see more of it in due course.

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The gatehouse, once a hunting lodge before the big house was built.
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The main house.

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FOWEY

The least impressive of the places we visited.

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TINTAGEL

An extraordinarily scenic place, will be getting several posts in this series.

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I will be covering this bridge in detail – for the moment suffice to say that it is both superb and very necessary.

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This view from the heights of Tintagel is currently my desktop background.
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The sun prevented me from getting a really got picture of this view.

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The old church

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The bridge from above.

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THE JAMAICA INN

This is well known to fans of Daphne Du Maurier and/ or Rosamunde Pilcher. We stopped there on the way back from Tintagel.

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CHARLESTOWN

I enjoyed visiting this town, though as you will see when I post about it I consider it over-hyped.

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THE MEAL

This was a success.

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FALMOUTH

The last activity of the holiday – and talk about finishing on a high note. I will certainly be revisiting this town

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This splendid mosaic can be seen at Falmouth Docks station.

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The National Maritime Museum Cornwall.
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Views of Falmouth from the look out tower in the museum

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