The Ouse Amateur Sailing Club

The final post in my account of Heritage Open Day – dealing with the Ouse Amateur Sailing Club.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the final part of my account of Heritage Open Day 2017. Once I have published this post I will be creating a page to make this series of posts more accessible, but for the present my account of the day consists of:

  • Overview – covering the whole day and indicating which aspects of it would receive dedicated posts.
  • 27 King Street – Focussing specifically on the building where I did my stint as a volunteer steward.
  • 2 Hampton Court – A mainly photographic account of a unique experience at a property that is currently being renovated.
  • The IFCA Boat – My visit to the Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority research vessel moored at the pontoon jetty.

SETTING THE SCENE

After two hours volunteering at 27 King Street I was feeling drained because of the level of interaction involved in the process. I therefore decided to head to the Ouse Amateur Sailing Club on Ferry Lane, which opens it doors to non-members on Heritage Open Day, and where I could spend a bit of time on their river view terrace and decide whether to call it a day or to head home. 

AT THE CLUB

My pint purchased I duly headed for the terrace. The weather was too chilly to permit staying outside for too long, so I made periodic trips back inside to warm up. I resolved the decision of what to do next in favour of calling it a day, and headed for home having had a good day.

PHOTOGRAPHS

DrakesFerriesView from the terraceBirdsBirds 2FerryFerry 2Flying cormorant5218View from the terrace 2BuildingBlakeneyn to HappisburghBlakeney HarbourThe WashBrancasterKing's LynnBrass object

Ferry Lane
The one picture here not directly associated with the club, but since it kis at the top end of Ferry Lane it belongs here.

 

Heritage Open Day 2017 – Overview

An overview of Heritage Open Day 2017 and the solution to a mathematical problem.

INTRODUCTION

Yesterday was Heritage Open Day in KIng’s Lynn, and as readers of this blog will know I was one of the volunteers helping to run the event. This post is a scene setter, giving an overview and indicating which parts of the day I will be giving individual posts to later on. At the end of this post I will include the answer the puzzle I posed at the end of my previous post

STARTING THE DAY

I was going be stewarding at 27 King Street from 12 until 2, and knowing that I would find that experience a draining one I decided to see a handful of places before 12. The first place I visited was the one I had marked down as “must see”, because it was probably the only time the opportunity would be there do so –

NO 2 HAMPTON COURT

This property being currently vacant and of considerable historic interest it was open, and within was a little local history exhibition as well as the place itself. I will be giving this a dedicated post, so here for the moment is a single picture to whet your appetite:

Ground plans - 1500 and present day

I decided to head for King Street by way of the river front, and between this property and the river front is…

THE SECRET GARDEN

I knew that my aunt would be running things in this garden, so a quick visit seemed in order.

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When this was first built those arches fronted directly on to the river.

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The main attraction (especially as the cockling boat Baden Powell was absent) down at the river front was, as on previous occasions…

THE IFCA RESEARCH VESSEL

IFCA stands for Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority, and their remit is to insure that population levels of sea creatures living within six nautical miles of the shore do not decrease too dramatically. I will be creating a dedicated post about this, so I offer this picture as bait…

 

IFCA map

My plan on leaving this vessel was to…

PAY A PRELIMINARY VISIT TO 27 KING STREET

I deemed it sensible to familiarise myself with the building that I would be stewarding, so that was my next port of call. As I was at the river front I decided to go by way of the Lower Purfleet, where there was sure to be something interesting happening…

Queen Street
The first three pictures were taken on my out from my flat, before we get to stuff from the section between the river and King Street.

Saturday Market PlaceTown HallBPbusFlying gullFerryLower PurfleetYeomanryYeomanry 2HeadgearHelmet plate

THE TUESDAY MARKET PLACE AND ENVIRONS

After my preliminary look around No 27 King Street I had half an hour to spare, so headed in the direction of the Tuesday Market Place. I paid calls at three buildings in that area, Bishop’s Lynn House, St Ann’s House and St Nicholas Chapel before heading back to no 27…

TMP2TMP3TMP4Bishop's Lynn HouseSt Ann's HouseSAH1SAH2SAH3St NicholasDoorwaySt Nick's interiorFontCourt in cornerConsistory CourtFancy DressCCGbird and bible 2chandelierBird and biblebird and bible 3OrganwindowPlaqueScreen on seaDann'sLumiere posterStage

VOLUNTEERING AT 27 KING STREET

I arrived back at no 27 a few minutes early. My fellow steward for the 12PM to 2PM slot turned out to be veteran councillor Lesley Bambridge.  As I will be writing a dedicated post about this I will say no more here. For a picture, here is a quirky architectural feature:

Ellipsoid skylight 4
I have never seen a skylight shaped like this – for the moment until I get more information I will call it the Ellipsoid Skylight.

A CLUB ON FERRY LANE

After finishing at 27 King Street I made my next port of call the Ouse Amateur Sailing Club, where I consumed a pint. After that I decided it was time to call it a day as I was unsurprisingly feeling ‘peopled out’ – 27 King Street attracted a lot of visitors while I was there. Here is a picture taken while at the club:

View from the terrace
This is the view looking downriver from the club’s terrace.

THE 101 PROBLEM

In “Anderson Joins the 500 Club and Other Stuff” I included the following problem from brilliant:

SC100 - q

 First of all the answer:

SC100 - a

There at least three areas of mathematical knowledge that would give you an ‘in’ to this one – logarithms, compound interest and Pascal’s triangle. Since I have some knowledge of all three this problem barely brought a crease to my brow. Here are a couple of good solutions from others:

solution1

The second solution I am sharing here had a particular appeal to me:

solution2

Just to finish, the exact power  (in terms of positive integers) of 101 that is the the first to begin with a number other than 1 is 70, and 101 ^ 70 runs to 140 digits. 

 

Heritage Open Day: Post Lunch

The conclusion of my series about Heritage Open Day.

INTRODUCTION

This post completes my account of this year’s Heritage Open Day in King’s Lynn.

A HOUSE, A CLUB AND A FERRY

On way out for my afternoon’s explorations I poked my head round the door of the Rathskellar, but decided not to go in. Queues and crowds notwithstanding I decided that my first port of call of the afternoon would be…

CLIFTON HOUSE

This house is the residence of the current head of English Heritage, and featured rooms open to the public on five different levels, and viewing area on yet a sixth (basement, ground floor, the four intermediate floors of the tower and the roof of the tower). The first part of the building that was opened up featured the cellar, the kitchen and a couple of rooms which could be viewed but not entered. I started by going down to the…

CELLAR

When the house was first built the cellar had been accessible direct from the river (which is now about 50 yards west of the house), and a system of ropes and pulleys was used to offload cargo…

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The first three pictures were taken en route to the cellar.

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Note the vaulted ceiling of the cellar.
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Three iron rings through which thick ropes could run enabled cargo to winched from boats into the cellar. I am not certain if all three are visible in this picture, but I tried to show them all.

After the cellar, it was time for the rest of that part of the building, and on towards the tower by way of…

THE KITCHEN

There were some very interesting things to be seen even though this had the feeling of being merely on the way to somewhere else, because of course what everyone was really interested in seeing was the tower.

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These canons were in a reception area just outside the kitchen.
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The remaining four photographs were all taken in the kitchen.

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Apart from one last major queue because of limitations on the number of people being allowed in there at any one time (for obvious safety reasons) it was now time to venture the…

TOWER

There were interesting things to see on each level of the tower…

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These antique maps and the model of the house were on the first floor of the tower.

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One floor up was a room set up for a Jacobean supper.

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This room was a further floor up

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The ‘Prospect Room’ is one floor below the roof.

The views from the roof were amazing. Conscious of the number of other people who were waiting to savour the views I restricted myself to a few minutes taking the view from all angles, before heading back down.

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Looking towards The Wash
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The Lower Purfleet from above

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The view focussing between St Nicholas Chapel and the docks.

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My humble abode viewed from the top of the Clifton House Tower.

Leaving Clifton House I headed for Ferry Lane, where I paid a call at the premises of

THE OUSE AMATEUR SAILING CLUB

This establishment, which has about 5o sailing members and somewhere around 500 ‘social’ members had opened its Ferry Bar to the public for the day. I consumed a pint of a splendid beer brewed in Lowestoft (just into Suffolk, but possibly close enough to count as local, especially as the other featured brewery is based in Southwold, a little further away). Having purchased my drink I took some photos inside…

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I then went outside on to the balcony overlooking the Great Ouse, and took some photographs from this great vantage point…

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It was at this point that my attention was caught by something downriver, which turned out to be…

THE ARRIVAL OF A FISHING BOAT

Given the role that fishing, and indeed the sea as a whole has played in the history of our town this was a particular splendid sight…

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The first glimpse.

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Turning into the docks and therefore presenting a side-on view.

After finishing my pint I headed for the

FERRY

I finished my day by taking the special ‘Heritage Open Day’ trip on the ferry, which involves a small amount of travel along the river as well as across it. This was my first trip on the new ferries, which are equipped with caterpillar tracks for crossing the exposed mud at low tide. The King’s Lynn Ferry has been in operation for over 800 years.

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The other historic bus (my second post in the series featured the one put on by Towler’s), this one a routemaster.

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