The Ouse Amateur Sailing Club

The final post in my account of Heritage Open Day – dealing with the Ouse Amateur Sailing Club.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the final part of my account of Heritage Open Day 2017. Once I have published this post I will be creating a page to make this series of posts more accessible, but for the present my account of the day consists of:

  • Overview – covering the whole day and indicating which aspects of it would receive dedicated posts.
  • 27 King Street – Focussing specifically on the building where I did my stint as a volunteer steward.
  • 2 Hampton Court – A mainly photographic account of a unique experience at a property that is currently being renovated.
  • The IFCA Boat – My visit to the Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority research vessel moored at the pontoon jetty.

SETTING THE SCENE

After two hours volunteering at 27 King Street I was feeling drained because of the level of interaction involved in the process. I therefore decided to head to the Ouse Amateur Sailing Club on Ferry Lane, which opens it doors to non-members on Heritage Open Day, and where I could spend a bit of time on their river view terrace and decide whether to call it a day or to head home. 

AT THE CLUB

My pint purchased I duly headed for the terrace. The weather was too chilly to permit staying outside for too long, so I made periodic trips back inside to warm up. I resolved the decision of what to do next in favour of calling it a day, and headed for home having had a good day.

PHOTOGRAPHS

DrakesFerriesView from the terraceBirdsBirds 2FerryFerry 2Flying cormorant5218View from the terrace 2BuildingBlakeneyn to HappisburghBlakeney HarbourThe WashBrancasterKing's LynnBrass object

Ferry Lane
The one picture here not directly associated with the club, but since it kis at the top end of Ferry Lane it belongs here.

 

Heritage Open Day 7: Fisheries Research

The Great Ouse, the western boundary of King’s Lynn (on the other bank is West Lynn), is a commercial river, and the area has a long history of fishing. It was therefore both appropriate and very welcome that there was some exceedingly interesting and educational stuff provided by fisheries research people.

Not only did they lay on a full tour of their research vessel, in addition they had an exhibit featuring marine wildlife. Some of the younger folk were allowed to handle these creatures in carefully controlled circumstances. The featured image was also available to be taken away – a copy now adorns my outside table (and has survived a night’s rain).

One of the things that fisheries research does is monitor, and where necessary take preventive action, the proportion of juveniles that are being caught. Obviously, creatures caught while still juvenile are denied the opportunity to breed, whereas if they are only caught once they have already had the opportunity to breed future generations are protected.

What are the possible consequences of neglect? Well, when John Cabot first set eyes on the Grand Bank he had never seen such a preponderance of fish in a single location. Yet in 1997, 500 years (in natural history terms not even an eyeblink) after this, the Grand Banks Fishery closed for good – there were no fish left.

This was one of the most interesting and beyond a shadow of a doubt THE most important element of the day. My next post will feature another boundary marker, the Southgates, meantime enjoy a selection of photographs…

Info screen 2 Info screen More maps Sideways view Lobster close up Red Crab Giant crab

Lobster
Lobster

Lobster 1 ?????????? Good map

The guideline again.
The guideline again.

?????????? ??????????

miniature submarine
This is a miniature remote controlled submarine, used in fisheries research.

Observation computer Map

Metal Pyramid
This pyramid (25cm each side at base – meaning that a cool 175,616,000 of these would make a pyramid to match Khufu’s! at Giza!) is used to take sea floor samples and check them for population density

A net

Heritage Open Day 7: Fisheries Research

The Great Ouse, the western boundary of King’s Lynn (on the other bank is West Lynn), is a commercial river, and the area has a long history of fishing. It was therefore both appropriate and very welcome that there was some exceedingly interesting and educational stuff provided by fisheries research people.

Not only did they lay on a full tour of their research vessel, in addition they had an exhibit featuring marine wildlife. Some of the younger folk were allowed to handle these creatures in carefully controlled circumstances. The featured image was also available to be taken away – a copy now adorns my outside table (and has survived a night’s rain).

One of the things that fisheries research does is monitor, and where necessary take preventive action, the proportion of juveniles that are being caught. Obviously, creatures caught while still juvenile are denied the opportunity to breed, whereas if they are only caught once they have already had the opportunity to breed future generations are protected.

What are the possible consequences of neglect? Well, when John Cabot first set eyes on the Grand Bank he had never seen such a preponderance of fish in a single location. Yet in 1997, 500 years (in natural history terms not even an eyeblink) after this, the Grand Banks Fishery closed for good – there were no fish left.

This was one of the most interesting and beyond a shadow of a doubt THE most important element of the day. My next post will feature another boundary marker, the Southgates, meantime enjoy a selection of photographs…

Info screen 2 Info screen More maps Sideways view Lobster close up Red Crab Giant crab

Lobster
Lobster

Lobster 1 ?????????? Good map

The guideline again.
The guideline again.

?????????? ??????????

miniature submarine
This is a miniature remote controlled submarine, used in fisheries research.

Observation computer Map

Metal Pyramid
This pyramid (25cm each side at base – meaning that a cool 175,616,000 of these would make a pyramid to match Khufu’s! at Giza!) is used to take sea floor samples and check them for population density

A net