About Autism

Some important autism themed pieces and a few of my photographs.

INTRODUCTION

I have several important links relating to autism to share with you, and I urge you to continue that sharing process. Just to remind my readers I am #actuallyautistic, and also branch secretary of the National Autistic Society’s West Norfolk branch, and in that latter capacity I will conclude this introduction by reminding you of NAS’s catchline:

UNTIL EVERYONE UNDERSTANDS

A NOTE ON ATTRIBUTIONS

I found some of these pieces by way of people other than the original author. In such cases as well as crediting the actual author I also intend to mention the person who gave me the tip off. If you seen an underlining anywhere it is a link, and those links that are body text will be in a colour other than black to further highlight them.

INCLUSIVE AUTISTIC TRAITSAUTISTICALITY

This piece was brought to my attention when the Neurodivergent Rebel reblogged it. It is a long piece, but very readable and absolutely bang on the money. The list itself is too long to quote here, but the screenshot below which explains the problems that the post goes on to address brilliantly is a good start:

IAT

THE LEFEVER BIKE RIDE

Paul and Jamie Lefever recently undertook a sponsored cycle ride from King’s Lynn to the National Autistic Society’s HQ in London, a distance of 118 miles. A full account, under the title “11-year-old Jamie cycles 118 miles for our charity (4 September 2017)” is available on the NAS website.

Jamie Lefever.

ABA THERAPISTS BUSTED

This piece, written by Amy Sequenzia, a well known autistic person and advocate for autism, was originally posted on the autismwomensnetwork under the self explanatory title “ABA Providers Making Fun of Autistic People“. I include a graphic from this post below:

Image is a photo of a group of human figure-shaped wooden pegs clustered to the left and a single wooden peg standing off to the right. Text says,
Image is a photo of a group of human figure-shaped wooden pegs clustered to the left and a single wooden peg standing off to the right. Text says, “It is about how ABA “therapists” REALLY see Autistics. It is about them making fun of us because they see us as broken and hopeless. -Amy Sequenzia, autismwomensnetwork.org”

 PREPARING AN AUTISM FRIENDLY SECONDARY CLASSROOM

With the new school year just getting underway, Lynn McCann of Reachout ASC has published a very informative and constructive piece under the title “Preparing an autism friendly secondary classroom“. 

AN AUTISM RELATED TWEET

While preparing this post I saw the following tweet, from Paul Isaacs, so here it is:

WEB RESOURCES FROM THE NEURODIVERGENT REBEL

I end the post with something I have touched on before. Previously I only included the email address for those who wanted to add to the list. This time I include the list as well:

web resources

This is a growing list. Please send suggestions to NeurodivergentRebel@gmail.com

PHOTOGRAPHS

As always, I end this post with some of my own photographs:

wagtail in pigeon's shadow
The pigeon in the background helps to show how tiny this wagtail is.

Squirrel

climbing squirrel
No I have not rotated this shot – the squirrel really is on a vertical tree trunk.

high tide and sunset

Rathskellar and Hanse House
This shot shows Hanse House and the Rathskellar, the latter of which is hosting a charity beer festival this weekend.

Marriott'sPlaques

27 King Street
I was due to steward at 11-13 King Street between 12 and 2PM on Heritage Open Day, but this has now been changed to 27 King Street, which is this fine building.

27 King Street - plaque

EIFCA boat 2
The Eastern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Auhtority.
Cockler and research boat
The cockling boat Baden Powell and a Fisheries Research vessel.

Serene DawnCormorants and West Lynn ChurchCormorants 6 (1)Cormorants and gullsPC

 

Saturday Spectacular

Some stuff about Proptional Representation, some stuff about public transport, some stuff about “Save Trosa Nature” and some photographs.

INTRODUCTION

In this post I am going to be sharing stuff relating to three topics, and also displaying some of my own photographs. The weather here is so spectacular at present that not only am I creating this post while sitting outside, I am wearing a t-shirt. I shall move on to my first set of shares, which are themed around…

PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION

The First Past the Post (FPTP) method of deciding elections has had its day. It works reasonably well when two parties hoover up almost all the votes (though even then, as in 1951 when the Labour party got more votes than any party ever in any British General Election still ended up in opposition because of how those votes were distributed), but when the two biggest parties as is now the case in Britain command just 65% of the vote between them it is an epic fail, with barely more than a third of the votes cast being enough on occasions to hand one party a “majority”. I have two images, both found by way of twitter, and a link to share with you.

THE ARTICLE

The article to which I link is in the Guelph Mercury, and takes the form of a blistering opening letter to Canadian PM Justin Trudeau criticisng him for going back on his election commitment to electoral reform (Canada is one of only two democracies besides Britain which still uses FPTP – the other being the one that is so dysfunctional that Mr “Grab ’em by the pussy” was able to secure the top job).  To read this piece in full please click on the image below, which is taken from it:

Trudeau

The two images I am sharing point up the flaws of FPTP in two differing ways:

fptpfailFPTPbad

If anyone wishes to bring up the 2o11 referendum on voting reform thinking to use that to make a point, I suggest you think again: the sole alternative that was on offer then was very nearly as flawed as FPTP – AV IS NOT PR.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

I have a number of items to share here, some bad, some good. I will start with my journey to work yesterday morning. At 8:43AM (cutting it close, but manageable if no further time is wasted), a bus pulled into bay C at King’s Lynn bus station bearing the legend Fakenham X29. After it had disgorged a handful of passengers the driver told us we had to wait, and then a manager told him he had to take the bus into the parking slots in the centre of the bus station as it was being replaced with a single decker. For the run between King’s Lynn and Fakenham this would be adequate, but at Fakenham this bus becomes the 9:35 to Norwich, and single-decker is guaranteed to mean standees on that section of the route as that bus is the first of the morning on which old folk travel free. The end result of this was that it was just after 8:50AM when the bus actually got underway. As you will be seeing later, there was an incident on my return journey of a different kind.

A London Underground Worker Has Been Sacked For Helping a Pregnant Colleague Who Was Being Assaulted – Courtesy of Evolve Politics – 

This story, headlined as above on EvolvePolitics and ‘pressed’ by me on to my London Transport themed website is shocking in many different ways. Firstly, even without the actual evidence, which is pretty damning of London Underground bosses, in the event of an incident between staff and passengers the default position should be to side with staff. Secondly, London Underground claims to have a ‘zero-tolerance’ attitude to attacks on its staff. Thirdly, I consider the arrogant refusal of London Underground bosses even to contemplate the possibility that they might be in error to be very disturbing. On my way home from work yesterday, before I saw this piece, I witnessed a piece of unpleasantness on the bus in which I was travelling. I will summarize this incident in bullet point form:

  • Due to weight of traffic, rather than attempt to pull into the stopping zone outside the train station the driver stopped just before the station to let people off.
  • Just after he had started moving again and went past the station a passenger who had wanted to get off at the station and had failed to notice the stop started having a go at the driver about him not stopping.
  • The passenger continued this for the rest of the journey to the bus station. 

To make matters worse, the drop-off point at the bus station is only about 200m from the train station anyway. While I have been known to write in uncompromising terms to the offices of public transport companies I never target the staff who are actually attempting to deliver the service. This incident I have referred to is trivial compared to the one at the heart of the EvolvePolitics piece, which I link to, by way of the image below.

Having just referred you to one excellent source of political stories I now turn to another for a rather pleasanter story…

Part of Britain’s Railways Was Just Taken Into Public Ownership – Brought to you by The Canary

Kerry-Anne Mendoza’s magnificent creation, The Canary, has come up trumps again, with this story about a tiny part of our rail infrastructure (titled as per the first part of this section heading) coming back into public ownership in 2018. Obviously, it is a very small step in the right direction – towards a fully publicly owned and publicly accountable transport system – but it is a step in that direction nonetheless. To read the story in full please click on the image below:

Part of Britain’s railways was just taken into public ownership

I will end the public transport part of this post with…

A Trip Down Memory Lane Courtesy of Time Out

This is a fantastic photo archive showing the history of public transport in London since 1863 (when the world’s first underground railway line, then called the Metropolitan Railway, commenced operations). It has already featured on my London transport themed website. To view these pictures in their full glory please click on the one below which I have selected to act as the link.

This picture is headed as follows in the piece: Metropolitan Railway Guard Eva Carver. Mrs Carver can be seen dressed in uniform holding a lamp and flag by a staircase at Hammersmith Underground station, Metropolitan and Great Western Railways.

SAVE TROSA NATURE

I have links here to a recent blog post on this subject and to a nature website with strong connections to the subject matter of this section, and also to end this section and segue into the photos that end this post with a link to a post on facebook. 

The Blog Post

I reblogged this post when I first saw it, and now I am sharing it again. As with many of Anna’s nature themed posts this one features the meme she created based on some words I posted as a comment, and it is that that I use as the link.

The Website

The website, linked to in the blog post above, is called artportalen is about the species you can find in Sweden. To take a look at this site for yourself click on the image below:

The Segue Link

The facebook post to which I am linking contains a picture of an Apollo butterfly, a species which I observed on an island in the outer reaches of the Stockholm Archipelago but never on the mainland. The area around Trosa apparently is home to this rare species. To view this post and the picture featured there please click on the photograph below, which is my own.

DSCN8219

PHOTOGRAPHS

Finally to end this post:

butterfly1
These photos start and finish with butterflies.

upperpurfleetDSCN5108fb5fb4DSCN5111fbsDSCN5113blackbird4DSCN5115flyingbirdbusbirdssquirrelonchurchroofbirds (1)blackbird3bird2blackbird2birdmoorhen2fb3fb2fb1moorhensquirrelblackbirdgullsbeebutterfly3butterfly2

Heritage Open Day 12: Conclusion

Helped by some magnificent weather, King’s Lynn was set off to best advantage on Heritage Open Day. The place was choc-a-bloc with things to do and to see, and with people taking advantage of the opportunity to do so. Although my own peregrinations only occupied three hours or so, by the time you add in the time spent editing photos and creating blog posts and it has occupied my attention for approximately 12 hours.

Obviously, the highlight for me was the fisheries research stuff, but I thoroughly enjoyed everything. I will sign off this series of posts with a photographic highlights package…

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Heritage Open Day 7: Fisheries Research

The Great Ouse, the western boundary of King’s Lynn (on the other bank is West Lynn), is a commercial river, and the area has a long history of fishing. It was therefore both appropriate and very welcome that there was some exceedingly interesting and educational stuff provided by fisheries research people.

Not only did they lay on a full tour of their research vessel, in addition they had an exhibit featuring marine wildlife. Some of the younger folk were allowed to handle these creatures in carefully controlled circumstances. The featured image was also available to be taken away – a copy now adorns my outside table (and has survived a night’s rain).

One of the things that fisheries research does is monitor, and where necessary take preventive action, the proportion of juveniles that are being caught. Obviously, creatures caught while still juvenile are denied the opportunity to breed, whereas if they are only caught once they have already had the opportunity to breed future generations are protected.

What are the possible consequences of neglect? Well, when John Cabot first set eyes on the Grand Bank he had never seen such a preponderance of fish in a single location. Yet in 1997, 500 years (in natural history terms not even an eyeblink) after this, the Grand Banks Fishery closed for good – there were no fish left.

This was one of the most interesting and beyond a shadow of a doubt THE most important element of the day. My next post will feature another boundary marker, the Southgates, meantime enjoy a selection of photographs…

Info screen 2 Info screen More maps Sideways view Lobster close up Red Crab Giant crab

Lobster
Lobster

Lobster 1 ?????????? Good map

The guideline again.
The guideline again.

?????????? ??????????

miniature submarine
This is a miniature remote controlled submarine, used in fisheries research.

Observation computer Map

Metal Pyramid
This pyramid (25cm each side at base – meaning that a cool 175,616,000 of these would make a pyramid to match Khufu’s! at Giza!) is used to take sea floor samples and check them for population density

A net

Heritage Open Day 7: Fisheries Research

The Great Ouse, the western boundary of King’s Lynn (on the other bank is West Lynn), is a commercial river, and the area has a long history of fishing. It was therefore both appropriate and very welcome that there was some exceedingly interesting and educational stuff provided by fisheries research people.

Not only did they lay on a full tour of their research vessel, in addition they had an exhibit featuring marine wildlife. Some of the younger folk were allowed to handle these creatures in carefully controlled circumstances. The featured image was also available to be taken away – a copy now adorns my outside table (and has survived a night’s rain).

One of the things that fisheries research does is monitor, and where necessary take preventive action, the proportion of juveniles that are being caught. Obviously, creatures caught while still juvenile are denied the opportunity to breed, whereas if they are only caught once they have already had the opportunity to breed future generations are protected.

What are the possible consequences of neglect? Well, when John Cabot first set eyes on the Grand Bank he had never seen such a preponderance of fish in a single location. Yet in 1997, 500 years (in natural history terms not even an eyeblink) after this, the Grand Banks Fishery closed for good – there were no fish left.

This was one of the most interesting and beyond a shadow of a doubt THE most important element of the day. My next post will feature another boundary marker, the Southgates, meantime enjoy a selection of photographs…

Info screen 2 Info screen More maps Sideways view Lobster close up Red Crab Giant crab

Lobster
Lobster

Lobster 1 ?????????? Good map

The guideline again.
The guideline again.

?????????? ??????????

miniature submarine
This is a miniature remote controlled submarine, used in fisheries research.

Observation computer Map

Metal Pyramid
This pyramid (25cm each side at base – meaning that a cool 175,616,000 of these would make a pyramid to match Khufu’s! at Giza!) is used to take sea floor samples and check them for population density

A net

King’s Lynn, Apple Picking and Brownies

The Jetty on the Great Ouse was in use yesterday morning, by research vessels relating to fishing. With the river at high tide there were plenty of opportunities for good photographs. In the afternoon I went apple picking in the orchards at Sandringham. The apples were comfortably up to their usual amazing standard – and they were Cox’s. A hand-picked Cox is the finest of all apples.

Before heading home to King’s Lynn I enjoyed a fine supper at my parents house in East Rudham. After some excellent lamb chops there were raspberry brownies for pudding. My mother had reduced the amount of sugar from the 225g stated in the recipe to 150g so that the pudding while rich was not particularly sweet – and was all the better for this.

Today is Heritage Open Day, so stand by for some good posts about historic buildings and meanwhile enjoy a selection of cracking photos…

Fisheries Research
Fisheries Research Boat moored at the jetty

?????????? Eastern Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority ?????????? ?????????? Nar meets Ouse Arctic Tern Black backed gull ?????????? ??????????

Sycamore seed pod
Sycamore seed pod that resembles a propeller

\Moorhens 1 Moorhens 2 ?????????? Moorhens 3 ?????????? Station Flag ?????????? Apple Tree Apple

Apple
This apple looked particularly fine – and tasted even finer!

Flitcham War Memorial

Fresh peas - just podded by yours truly
Fresh peas – just podded by yours truly
Raspberry brownies
Raspberry brownies!

Old Chapel