Autism Events V: Saturday in London Part 3

My final blog post about the Anna Kennedy Autism Expo.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the fifth and final installment in my Autism Events series, concluding my account of the Anna Kennedy Autism Expo a week ago yesterday (still to come are some related posts on my London transport themed website and a page on this site bringing everything together).

THREE MORE TALKS

I will handle these talks in exact chronological order, starting with…

THE AUTISTIC DAD

This one was slightly problematic for me, although I welcome another autistic person being given the opportunity to speak. The biggest problem I had lay in his comments about vaccines, which I found particularly hard to stomach given that since he is autistic there is an obvious genetic component to his son’s autism. This talk did not inspire as much as I had hoped, and a week on I do not feel any happier about it.

The Autistic DadIntroductionScreen 2Career HighlightsFamily BackgroundFamily IIFamily IIIFamily IVFamily V

SPORT FOR CONFIDENCE

This was a wonderful talk by Lyndsey Barrett, a former netball international (she had a very serious illness which nearly killed her, but is now back playing netball to a good level although she has not yet been recalled by England) and founder of the eponymous Sport for Confidence.

Sport for confidence

Lyndsey Barrett
Lyndsey Barrett.

In the BeginningThe ProgrammeProgrammeModelContributions and BenefitsPartner contributionsProgramme BenefitsCS1InterventionOutcomesCS2GoalsIntervention and outcomesOOSummary

AN EXCELLENT FINISH

The final talk was from one of the people from Green Board Games (see my first post about this event for more) and although I was very tired by this stage of the day I thoroughly enjoyed it. 

Toy talkPicturesdon't dis my abilityThe Strength of ObservationAspieswired differentlySpeakerQuirksSuccess looks different

HOMEWARD BOUND

Leaving the event I headed back to Uxbridge station, and got a Metropolitan line train into London, arriving at King’s Cross in good time to catch the 18:44, arriving into King’s Lynn at 20:22. Here are a few pics from the return journey, although the battery in my camera was running on fumes by that stage of the day.

Hillingdon footbridge
This footbridge is at Hillingdon, one stop out from Uxbridge.
Rayner's Lane buidings III
The station building at Rayners Lane, which functions as a bridge between the platforms as well is one Charles Holden’s most famous.
chilternrailways.co.uk
Chiltern Railways, with which the Metropolitan is closely integrated. Chiltern Railways‘ historical predecessor, the Great Central railway was a creation of Sir Edward Watkin, who also ;played a massive role in the Metropolitan’s history. This train is at Harow-on-the-Hill.
Distant Wembley
A distant view of Wembley Stadium.

 

Autism Events IV: Saturday in London Part 2

Takes my story of the Anna Kennedy Autism Expo up to the end of the first of the talks that I attended.

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the fourth post in my Autism Events series. This is Part 2 of my coverage of the Anna Kennedy Autism Expo which took place at the Eastern Gateway Building, Brunel University. For those joining the series at this point the previous post are:

  1. Autism Events I: Norwich
  2. Autism Events II: Norwich part 2
  3. Autism Events III: Saturday in London Part 1

This post will cover the remainder of the stalls at the event and the first of the talks that I attended.

AROUND THE HALL

This is a story that will be told largely via photographs…

Autism Heroes

autistic artwork
Autistic artwork.

fidget bed

Oojamabobs
Yes folks – a whole stall devoted to selling fidget/stim toys.

Aspie and me

OT Practice

PAUL ISAACS TALK

Paul is autistic himself, and his talk was both informative and inspiring. Notice that as with the Autism Anglia event in Norwich this event gave autistic voices lots of opportunity to be heard. Here are some pictures from this talk. 

Meeting room I
Because of the shape of the meeting room it was equipped with two big screens, one for each half of it.
Paul Isaacs talk
Paul’s talk on the screen.
Ready to go
Paul ready to start his talk, while event organiser Anna Kennedy watches from the corner. She kept all the speakers informed as to how they were doing timewise.
Paul Isaacs
Paul Isaacs speaking

Fruit salad approach

Early years

Autism Fruit Salad

Asperger and Autist brains
Autistic and Aspergian traits.

Brain close-up

Aspie traits
Close up of the Aspergian traits list
Autie traits
Autistic traits close up
Aspinauts
The ones in the middle
Personhood
Although I choose when using such descriptions to refer to myself as an autistic person, with ‘person’ coming after ‘autistic’ I am with Paul in asserting my personhood.
Pauls Books
Paul’s considerable output.

Autism Events III: Saturday in London Part 1

The first of several posts about the Anna Kennedy Autism Expo.

INTRODUCTION

Greetings from a cold, snowy King’s Lynn. Welcome to the third in this mini-series of Autism Events posts, following on from:

  1. Autism Events I: Norwich
  2. Autism Events II: Norwich part 2

Most of this post covers events from a week ago yesterday, but before I get into the main body of it there is on little thing I need to attend to first:

AN AMENDMENT AND AN APOLOGY

For those of you who saw the original version of Autism Events II, you will notice should you revisit it that I have removed many of Amanda Hind’s slides from it. This was at her specific request, on the course of a very friendly twitter exchange. I have never previously been asked to remove photographs of slides from a post, but I fully acknowledge Amanda’s right to make the request, and I acted on it very promptly. This is by way of both explaining why I edited that post after it had been up for a while and apologizing in this blog for publishing more of Amanda’s slides than she was happy to see published.

THE ANNA KENNEDY AUTISM EXPO – GETTING THERE

The event was taking place at Brunel University’s Eastern Gateway building in Uxbridge. This meant getting a train and changing at King’s Cross. The Metropolitan line route from King’s Cross to Uxbridge is more direct than that of the Piccadilly line, and the Metropolitan line platforms take less long to get to from the railway line, so I opted for that route. I also decided that even though it would almost certainly mean not being there for the very start of the event that I would get the 6:54 rather than the 5:54 from King’s Lynn. I will be covering the Metropolitan line element of the journey in detail on my London transport themed website, but here are some photos from the journey…

Display board
On the platofrm – note that mine is the second train due in.
Chesham train I
The chesham train – doors open.
Concertina section of articulated stock
The new stock operating on the Circle, District, Hammersmth & Cty and Metropolitan lines is articulated in the manner of Swedish Tunnelbana stock rather than using old-fashioned bogie couplings.
Route Map KCSP II
The route map at King’s Cross St Pancras
Metropolitan line
The Metropolitan line route map on the train.
Jubilee line train
A Jubilee line train (from just before Finchley Road to just after Wembley Park the Jubilee and Metropolitan lines run side by side)
Crossing Kilburn High Road
Crossing Kilburn High Road.
Piccadilly line train
A Piccadilly line train (from Rayners Lane to Uxbridge the Metropolitan and Piccadilly lines run in tandem).
Uxbridge II
A roundel at Uxbridge station.
Uxbridge Clock
The clock at Uxbridge station.
Stained glass, Uxbridge
Stained glass windows at Uxbridge station.
Station frontage, Uxbridge
The outside frontage of the station

 

Uxbridge Station
The full surface building.

The walk from Uxbridge Station to the venue was supposed to take about 25 minutes, but I went the wrong way at first, so it took me a bit longer than that. I arrived at the venue a bit late, but soon got stuck into visiting all the stalls, to see what people were doing and to tell people about myself and NAS West Norfolk. I will now share a few thoughts and photos from a couple of those stalls.

GREEN BOARD GAME COMPANY

I spoke to two of the people from this company, which creates games aimed specifically at helping SEND children, including autistic children. I got to sample a couple of the games as well – they look very good to me. Please note that the title of this section is formatted as a link to their homepage. 

Toy corner I
Some of the products.
Shaperise
This is a viciously hard game – you have 30 seconds to look at the shape and memorise it and you then have to use the blocks to construct it.
Corner'd
This is tough in the early stages, but as more spaces are filled it gets easier to place your pieces.
Qbitz
This one can be played in two ways. Either require the players to memorise the shape they will be building or leave it on display. You have to place as many blocks as you can without rotating them, then when no more can be used towards making the shape pick the unused blocks up and roll them like dice to reveal new faces, and so on until you have completed the shape (the completed shape here, using light blue blocks was the work of yours truly.

JOELY COLMER

Joely Colmer is an autistic woman whose website I linked to via the title of ths section. As well as her website she is the author of a book about her experiences, “Aspergerworld: My Fairy Jam Jar”. 

SOME PHOTOS FROM THE VENUE

I will end this post with some of the photographs I took of general stuff at the venue:

AKOGlobe1628 Petition of Right

light four 1
These last two poctures are of a boat that hangs from the ceiling of that building.
light four two
It is of the type referred to in rowing circles as a ‘light four’ (there are two types of four person rowing boats, the light as seen here, and the ‘tub four’).