A Vote and A Day at Work

An account of a vote, a bus journey anbd a day at work.

INTRODUCTION

I am going to cover today’s events in chronological order…

THE VOTE

The easy way to make sure that you get something done is to do it early. Therefore I set off early from my flat so as to call in at the polling station before heading to catch my bus. My vote duly cast (Remain just in case anyone did not already know my intentions) I had more time than I needed to get to the bus station so I walked by a scenic route bagging a few photos along the way…

HEADING TO WORK

The bus arrived in good time, and the journey went without a hitch, helped along from my perspective by the non-stop action taking place in “The Great Zoo of China” (I borrowed the hardback earlier, see here for more details).

DZ

Just over two full pages which give an idea as to just how things are going to go horrifically wrong!

WORK

Not many photos from today as not much stuff was actually ready to be imaged, so I brought the database up to date. Here are images of the few lots that were ready for me…

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A Spectacular Recovery

An account of the dramatic finish to yesterday’s ODI between England and Sri Lanka, some links and some photographs.

INTRODUCTION

This post is about the closing stages of yesterday’s ODI between England and Sri Lanka, which I listened to once I had got home from work.

A DISTANT PROSPECT

When I switched the commentary on Sri Lanka had made a respectable 286, which by that stage was looking positively mountainous since England were 39-4. When skipper Eoin Morgan was out for 42 to make the score 73-5, and Moeen Ali also fell cheaply to a poor shot the situation looked even grimmer for England, as Chris Woakes walked out to join Jos Buttler…

A GREAT PARTNERSHIP

Buttler and Woakes fared better than had seemd posssible when they came together, and gradually victory moved from the realms of fantasy to a distant but imaginable outcome to a genuine possibility. Two wickets in quick succession, Buttler and then Dvaid Willey seemed to have once again settled things in Sri Lanka’s favour, but Liam Plunkett (surely the most talented batsman ever to be at number 10 by design) played well alongside Woakes who established a record score for a number 8 in an ODI. In the end it came down to…

A SPECTACULAR FINAL OVER

At the start of this final over 14 were needed for England to win. Good bowling restricted England to seven off the first five, meaning that unless a wide or a no-ball was bowled England could no longer win. Neither was forthcoming, but Liam Plunkett did hit that final ball for six to level the scores and earn England a tie after a come-back of epic proportions.

LINKS

My first link, just to tie up the loose ends from the first part of this post is to an official account of yesterday’s ODI, courtesy of cricinfo.

My remaining links are all on the subject of referendums and one referendum in particular. I start with David Hencke’s post about why he will be voting for remain.

My next two links are both to posts from that legal eagle of the blogging world jackofkent, first a detailed analysis of what he sees as the flaws of referendums, and second, acoompanied by a screenshot below and some subsidiary comments of my own afterwards a proposal for banning referendums:

JoK

I would change clause 2 of the above act to read:

2. This Act can only be repealed by a unanimous vote in the house (for the purposes of this Act abstentions and absences count as votes against).

PHOTOS

For anyone who has read all the foregoing text here is your bonus in the form of some recent photographs:

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Although the day rider plus that is my standard bus ticket specifically excludes the coasthopper whose route map is pictured here, coasthopper buses sometimes run other routes, notably the X8 between King’s Lynn and Fakenham.

 

England Staring Down Both Barrels

INTRODUCTION

As well as a personal account of yesterday’s cricket I have my usual selection of links, infographics and photos to share with you. Enjoy the ride…

ENGLAND STARING DOWN BOTH BARRELS

England bowled reasonably well yesterday, taking the least eight Kiwi wickets for 220, the fly in the ointment being that this was from a starting position of 303-2 and therefore still left them facing a first innings deficit of 134. This was compounded by the loss of debutant opening batsman Lyth and the no 3 Ballance in the reply. To give themselves a chance of escaping England need to still be batting by lunch time tomorrow (and probably a while after as well).

This England team, with Moeen Ali batting at no 8 and therefore being considered a front-line bowler, bore all the hallmarks a team selected with avoidance of defeat in mind, rather than going for victory, and the lack of bowling depth told in the New Zealand innings. Just to make one thing clear: Moeen Ali is a fine cricketer, it is just that he is not by any stretch of the imagination a front-line spinner (and his county, Worcestershire, have never used him as such).

Struggling like this against New Zealand does not bode well for the main meat of the summer, the visit of the oldest enemy.

INFOGRAPHIC

Just the one infographic today, concerned with the Irish referendum on gay marriage:

MR

LINKS

My first two links concern disability hate crimes, the main article having been shared widely on twitter (13 RTs and counting since I posted a link to it). The first of the two links is to the post on Vox Political that put me on to the story (although I must register a mild protest about VP’s current policy of putting out vast numbers of small posts – it seriously clogs the inbox) by way of acknowledging my source. Here then after that preamble are the key links:

1) Vox Political Intro

2) Guardian Article

The natural follow on from this is an article from Welfare Weekly about the scandalously high unemployment rate among disabled people.

My next two links both concern Autism. The first is a petition via 38 degrees which I urge everyone to sign and share. The second is a link to a post about a research project for which I have already signed up and I urge other autistic people to do likewise.

My last link is to a petition being run by change.org calling for 16 and 17 year-olds to be able vote in the EU referendum. Since I would extend all political votes to this age group I had no hesitation in signing and sharing, and I hope that others will follow my example.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Only a few pictures to share with you today (I take this opportunity to thank everyone who is still with me and urge you to share any or all of this post)…
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